Waltja Milestones 1993 – 2014

Waltja has achieved many things since it was formed in 1993. We’re very proud of our achievements.

2014

  • In April, Veronica James from the Publications and Resource Unit (PRU) attended the DesArt Conference April 15th in Alice Springs.
  • Waltja’s Directors Meeting was held at Ross River Resort in May.  The program included: a Money Management Workshop, Waltja Culture Program Planning and Waltja Evaluation.
  • Waltja began offering a SupportLink Service, where Waltja receives referrals from NT Police for follow up support in the communities where Waltja provides Reconnect Youth Services.
  • Issues 56, 57 and 58 of Family News were produced by the team of Lenny Hillman, Veronica James and Jessica Muir.
  • Waltja staff Kate Lawrence and Hannah Hueneke facilitated the Disability Coordination Forum in Alice Springs on 6 June 2014.
  • An Aged Care Campout was held at 5 Mile near Papunya in May, for frail aged and disabled and their carers.
  • A School Engagement workshop was organised at Mt Liebig in July 2014.
  • Waltja Money Management workers Leela Kruger, Sonja Dare and Rachel Abbott gave a presentation on money issues for remote communities at the Money Workers Association of NT Conference, in August 2014 in Alice Springs. The presentation included a demonstration of one of the i-talk money stories produced in community languages by Waltja.
  • The Directors Meeting in August 2014 took place at Waltja premises in Alice Springs. Directors were visited by Reconciliation Australia Indigenous Governance Awards Panel –
  • Professor Mick Dodson, Glenda Hume, Emma White – because Waltja was one of 6 finalists in the category, and the panel’s role was to meet with finalists, the people and organisations they work with and determine which organisation was the winner.
  • Trainee, Leela Kruger, won the Group Training NT award for Indigenous Apprentice of the Year.  Leela went on to win a full-time position with Waltja as a Fieldworker in the
  • Money Management team.
  • Waltja’s Annual General Meeting was held at a Bush camp near Yuelamu in October 2014. There was strong competition in the elections for Directors and for Executive positions.
  • On October 30th Waltja won the Reconciliation Australia Indigenous Governance Awards Category A for Incorporated Organisations. Chairperson April Martin, Directors Wendy Brown and Rachel Tilmouth, Acting Manager Kate Lawrence received the award from the Prime Minister. Chair of the Judging panel, Professor Mick Dodson, described Waltja Tjutangku Palyapayi Aboriginal Corporation as “a very well-run organisation concentrating on delivering services to families and communities … Waltja is difficult to fault in its governance, it’s one of the best organisations I have encountered, the best in Australia.”
  • On 29th August, Waltja had an initial meeting with Life Without Barriers to form a partnership. Life Without Barriers offered a partnership because Waltja was a finalist in the Reconciliation Australia Indigenous Governance Awards and they were keen to work together.  This will be developed further in 2015.
  • Waltja was accepted into the NT Government NGO business support program, to support the development of Waltja’s social enterprise, Tjukurrpa Tjutangku.  This included the team participating in October Business Month events in Alice Springs and Darwin.
  • In October, over 50 people took part in a whole-of-community campout at Ltyentye Apurte (Santa Teresa) to support and encourage young people in the community.  The event was supported by Waltja Family Mental Health and Reconnect teams working with Waltja Director Mia Mulladad and local organisations.  It was a great success with lots of positive feedback from families and young people.

2013

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  • Waltja Executive members, Irene Nangala, April Martin and Wendy Brown and CEO Sharijn King worked as a team to gather evidence of their successes to each achieve the Diploma of Community Services Coordination.
  • Waltja undertook a major restructure in order to guarantee financial stability.
  • Waltja Directors Meeting was held at Wilora community in June 2014.
  • Waltja Directors wanted to build their skills and knowledge in community and family mediation.  With some funding support from an NT Regional Development Grant, Waltja was able organise Mediation Training with the Community Justice Centre, and workshops were held in October 2013 and March 2014.  This training was very well received, and
  • Waltja’s Directors Enid Gallagher and Wendy Brown were able to share their experience and knowledge from part of the Yuendumu Mediation and Justice committee which has worked hard to bring families together for peace in that community.
  • Waltja Reconnect Field Workers, Linda Brooks and Natalie Keene, did a great presentation on remote youth services at the Reconnect Forum in Adelaide in July 2013.
  • Waltja’s Annual General Meeting was held on 10th October at Chifley Alice Springs Resort.
  • Waltja auspiced the Big Sing in the Desert 2013 which was held May at Ross River Resort. Big Sing in the Desert brings together Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal singers from across Australia.
  • Waltja began a 3-year project called Grandmothers’ Stories, to support the transmission of cultural knowledge by Aboriginal women elders to younger generations.
  • Waltja named its developing arts social enterprise, Tjukurrpa Tjutangku – Everyone’s Dreaming Stories.
  • Waltja was successful in gaining support to run a Youth Worker Mentor Program, in conjunction with the Reconnect programs in Papunya, Mt Liebig, Titjikala and Santa Teresa.
  • Funding enabled Waltja to employ local Aboriginal people as mentors on a casual basis.  They gained skills, made a great contribution to Waltja’s work with young people, and some gained employment or places in further training as a result of their participation.
  • Waltja ran a market stall at the Mbantua Festival in October, selling artworks and promoting Waltja’s work.  Waltja trainees Shakita Lindner and Leela Kruger took part in the Mbantua Festival Talking Circles with other young Aboriginal leaders.
  • In November 2013, Waltja started the Family Mental Health Support Service (FMHSS) for Santa Teresa, Titjikala and Finke. Margaret Orr and Kate Lawrence went to Canberra for FMHSS Workshop.
  • Waltja auspiced the Desert Song Festival in September 2013. The Desert Song Festival showcased choirs from remote Aboriginal communities and from around Australia in Alice Springs. Waltja also assisted with travel for the remote community choirs.
  • In September 2013, five Waltja staff attended Women’s Law and Culture near Papunya.
  • Veronica James and Jessica Muir attended training for art workers through DesArt, to support their work in developing Tjukurrpa Tjutangku.

2012

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  • In March, the Money Management team ran a workshop with 30 Directors to discuss how the Directors could support the Money Management Program in their communities.
  • Waltja included as an example of a success story in Associate Professor Helen Meekosha’s speech at the 56th Session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, in New York. (Panel: Rural Women and Girls with Disabilities: Economic Empowerment and Political Participation).
  • Waltja staff attended the Reconnect Good Practice Forum in Adelaide
  • Waltja provided information to the Prime Minister’s Council on Youth Homelessness.
  • Waltja ended its registration as a Registered Training Organisation.
  • Waltja worked with Safe4Kids on their program to combat abuse and help children feel safe in their communities, supporting training in 9 communities for the whole community.  This was funded through the Aboriginal Benefits Trust.
  • Healthy Community, Healthy Life project ran two big walks where people walked and camped on country: Kintore with 30 women and children, and 80 people who walked from Mt Leibig to near Haasts Bluff.  People involved came from Kintore, Mt Leibig, Papunya, Ikuntji and several outstations. Irene Nangala, Marilyn Nangala and Isobel Gorey were key leaders in the project.  Workers involved were Kate Crossing, Cliff Alexander, Linda Brooks, Sarah Holder, Robbie Kopp and Belinda Inglis.
  • Waltja secured funds for a Young People’s Art Enterprise project to bring local community artists to workshops with young people to transfer knowledge and skills.
  • Waltja secured two years of funding from the Tim Fairfax Family Foundation for an art and cultural maintenance mentor program. This enabled publications staff to gain training in website management and for a trainee to gain skills and be mentored in the area of Arts Management.  This supported the development of Waltja’s Art based social enterprise, which was based in an old school building which Waltja bought and restyled into a shop, office and storage area.
  • Waltja secured funding through Healing Foundation to support smoking ceremonies, deliver family mapping and planning workshops and address issues of intergenerational trauma. This project will begin soon.
  • With the support of Amity Community Services and Responsible Gambling Awareness Week grants Waltja delivered workshops to community members on the wise use of money.
  • In collaboration with Matrix On Board, a custom-made data collection system was developed for brokerage and emergency relief services provided by Waltja.

2011

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  • In May over 100 frail aged and people with a disability attended Waltja’s Aged and Disability Festival at Hamilton Downs, with support from a number of project partners, and funding from Centrecorp, Department of Health and Aging and local businesses.
  • In June Waltja took young people from Titjikala and Finke on the Ltyentye Apurte Horse Trek on the outskirts of Santa Teresa as part of a BushMob Project. For five days the young people cooked, camped, shared stories and rode horses along the trail set by the Stockmen many years ago.
  • Waltja ran the Safety for Our Elders project to promote care, respect and dignity for old people, and to keep them safe.
  • Young Mums Program workers from Waltja went on lots of family trips out to country with older and young women, and collaborated with the Mobile Outreach Service at Atitjere, working with young girls aged 11-12 about personal safety and health.
  • Tjitji Kulunypa Tjuta – Little Children: a workbook about caring for young children and helping them learn was published by Waltja.  Contributors to the project were Teresa Butler-Bowdon and the Waltja Childcare team Christine Armstrong, Angie Zacharek, Dolly Hampton and Sharijn King.  The childcare training project was funded by DEEWR.
  • Waltja’s Reconnect team contributed to the review of the Youth Justice Act, the Prime Minister’s Council on Youth Homelessness, and participated on the expert panel on Strengthening Youth Resilience in Remote Communities at the NTCOSS Annual Conference in Alice Springs.
  • Money management workshops were held in Yuendumu, Yuelamu, Laramba, Nyirrpi, Mt Liebig, Wilora, Titjikala, Amoonguna.
  • Wendy Brown and Alma Granites participated in the World Expo in Beijing, demonstrating painting techniques and showing their art at the Australian Pavilion.
  • Waltja provided support to women from Titjikala and Areyonga for practice sessions and performances with the Soweto Gospel Choir from South Africa, performing in Areyonga and Alice Springs.
  • Waltja received funding for and began to plan the Healthy Community, Healthy Life project to help people learn about health nutrition and exercise. In August, Waltja held a 2-day Money Management workshop at the Desert Knowledge Precinct, in conjunction with the Know Your Rights Expo.  People came from Wilora and Titjikala.  In October, a 3-day Money Management workshop was held at Newhaven Sanctuary for people from Laramba, Nyirrpi and Yuendumu.
  • Waltja became a member of the National Disability Service – the national peak body representing people with a disability in Australia, because of Waltja’s work with people with disability, including the Disability Operations and Brokerage program.
  • Waltja’s Reconnect team ran a Youth Arts Development project in which young people in Papunya and Mt Leibig were mentored in painting and art by community elders.  This project was funded by DEEWR and supported by MacDonnell Shire and Papunya Tjupi Art Centre and Mt Leibig Art Centre.
  • Kintore celebrated 30 years since the establishment of the community – Waltja supported the celebrations, Irene Nangala playing a key role in Kintore.  Many Waltja members and staff attended.
  • Waltja and Desert Knowledge Cooperative Research Centre (DKCRC) won an award for Excellence in Innovation for our collaborative work developing the Community Guide for Aboriginal Knowledge and Intellectual Property Protocols (published by the DKCRC in 2009, republished by NintiOne in 2011).  Margaret Orr, Topsy Dixon, Isobel Nampitjinpa Gorey and Kate Lawrence were involved in this project.
  • Waltja received some extra funding for Emergency Relief for vulnerable groups, which enabled Waltja to provide some ongoing case management for people in need.
  • Waltja’s Wise Use of Money project helped families and community stay strong around problem gambling.
  • Waltja’s Youth Worker team managed a youth sport and recreation worker mentoring project in Engawala, Santa Teresa, Walungurru and Utju, with support from ITEP and Macdonnell and Central Desert Shires.
  • Waltja’s Safety for Our Elders program finished in September.
  • Waltja participated in Desertmob Marketplace, and members attended other events over the weekend.
  • Waltja’s Future Leaders project, with the support of the Sidney Myer Foundation, allowed Waltja Directors to mentor and up-skill younger women in the areas of governance and leadership.  A two-day workshop was held at the Alice Springs Desert Park in November in conjunction with Waltja’s AGM and involved 51 senior and young women from Kintore, Mount Liebig, Papunya, Yuendumu, Yuelamu, Titjikala, Santa Teresa, Willowra, Ti Tree, Utopia, Laramba, Nyirrpi, Engawala and Mpwelarre.
  • The then NT Minister, Malarrndiri McCarthy attended Waltja’s AGM.

2010

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  • Waltja published the 50th edition of Family News.
  • Waltja was featured as one of ten good news stories published by ANTAR and distributed nationally.
  • In October early childhood workers and staff from Waltja, MacDonnell Shire and Batchelor Institute met with Professor Alan Pence from the University of Victoria, Canada, in Alice Springs for The Yarning Circle, which focused on early childhood activities and training in remote communities.
  • Waltja Reconnect with Titjikala community member Johnny Young ran a wire toy program with ten young men from the community.  Tapatjatjaka Art Centre at Titjikala made an animation using the bush toys made by the men.
  • Waltja auspiced a Strong Women’s Reference Group of Central Australia, and hosted a project officer to help the group get established and become and incorporated body.
  • Women from Watarru, Nyapari, Kalka, Pipalyatjara and Kanpi communities in the APY Lands completed training in food preparation as part of the Certificate III in Children’s Services, working with the Waltja childcare team.
  • With funding from the Community Benefit Fund, Waltja’s young Mums program ran a workshop at Nyirrpi on preparing bush rubbing medicine.
  • At the AGM Waltja members came from across the Central Desert region and the APY lands. CEO, Sharijn King noted that 2010 had been Waltja’s strongest year yet, financially.
  • Waltja helped to organise the Building Up Young Girls, Strong Culture Camp Out during the school holidays for Arrernte women and Elders, at Ross River.
  • In November, Western Desert Dialysis celebrated its 10-year birthday at the Purple House in Alice Springs. Waltja advocated for the establishment of a dialysis service, helped to raise funds and auspiced the service until it was incorporated.
  • The Good Life for Our Elders project started. It was a training and support program for carers in the communities of Atitjere, Engawala and Mulga Bore.
  • In August, Amanda Nardoo attended the Garma festival with Bronwyn Taylor from DesArt, as part of Amanda’s art mentorship.  Amanda Nardoo also participated in the Desert Harmony Festival at Tennant Creek.
  • Christine Armstrong, Dolly Hampton and Teresa Butler-Bowden from Waltja’s Mobile Childcare Team were invited to speak at the SNAICC National Conference For Our Children: Local Strengths, National Challenges in Alice Springs. Waltja had a stall at the conference to tell participants about Waltja’s work and sell diary covers, artworks and resources to raise funds for emergency relief and aged care. It was a very successful stall.
  • Judith Bailey, Waltja’s receptionist and administration trainee, won the Award for the Most Outstanding Indigenous Trainee at Charles Darwin University.
  • Waltja began an accredited training project to deliver Certificate III in Children’s Services for people who wanted to be childcare workers. Teresa Butler-Bowden wrote the course and a workbook and Angie Zacharek joined the team as a trainer to deliver this training on communities.
  • Waltja’s Money Management program began to help individuals and families to learn about money, saving and budgets, and how to stay safe from money worries.  The Money management team ran workshops and helped individuals and families in Yuendumu, Laramba, Nyirrpi, Wilora, Yuelamu, Mt Leibig, Titjikala, Amoonguna, Iwupataka and through Waltja’s office in Alice Springs.

2009

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  • Senator Trish Crossin made a speech in parliament celebrating Waltja’s ten years.
  • Waltja’s ten-year celebratory art fundraising sale was held at Araluen Cultural Precinct in Alice Springs raising over $34,000 for Waltja’s Emergency Relief Program and Aged Care Program.
  • Waltja and WAVE – Women in Adult Vocational Education – workshop on women’s leadership and training issues for communities was held at Ross River.  This was run in conjunction with a workshop on developing Waltja’s new strategic plan.
  • Waltja commenced a health in housing project, Ngurra Ninti, in Kintore, Papunya, Mt Leibig and Ikuntji to help people live in a healthy and safe way in their houses.  This included workshops at Arrkilku (Town Bore), Kintore, Mt Liebig, Papunya and Ikuntji, fitting out a healthy house in Kintore, tree planting, nutrition and safe food storage workshops.  Waltja worked with Centre for Appropriate Technology, NT Environmental Health and MacDonnell Shire. Liz Downes was project worker and Kate Lawrence was project leader.
  • Ulkumantjuta Ukarratjuta Together for Learning: Waltja and WAVE Women Talking about Training project started. This collaboration with Women in Adult and Vocational Education (WAVE) focused upon learning and training needs in remote communities in Central Australia. Waltja and WAVE supported Aboriginal women leaders to undertake research in their own communities. Workshop on remote training needs/issues in Laramba with Waltja and WAVE members, then Regional Training Forum in Alice Springs with training organisations, government and WAVE.
  • Over 200 people from 19 remote communities and outstations participated in Waltja’s Aged and Disability Festival at 7 Mile, near Alice Springs.  The aim of the festival was to provide practical support, and acknowledgement to seniors in the community.  The festival was funded through Waltja fundraising (sale of artworks), Community Aged Care Centres and contributions from local businesses.
  • The new 2009-2019 Strategic Plan was launched at Waltja’s AGM.
  • Desert Knowledge Cooperative Research Centre (DKCRC) collaborated with Waltja to develop the Community Guide for Aboriginal Knowledge and Intellectual Property Protocols.  Margaret Orr, Topsy Dixon, Isobel Nampitjinpa Gorey and Kate Lawrence were involved in this project, with Sarah Holcombe and Alicia Boyle for DKCRC.
  • Waltja ran market stalls in Alice Springs to promote Waltja’s art social enterprise and to sell artwork to raise funds for the Emergency Relief Fund.  Waltja also participated in 2009 Desert Mob Market Place at Araluen in September.
  • Amanda Nardoo and April Martin participated in an Artist camp at 7 Mile run by DesArt.  Waltja received support from the Westpac Foundation for developing Waltja’s Art Social enterprise.
  • Waltja support NAIDOC Week activities in Titjikala with banner painting, a cook-off and band, and in Mt Leibig with banner painting, face painting and barbecues.  Waltja also supported bush schools with their celebrations.
  • Waltja offered the Certificate I in Community Services for PAW Media Aboriginal workers at Yuendumu.  Kate Lawrence, with support from Wendy Brown delivered the training. Participants created a New Workers Induction Manual and an OH&S Manual for PAW Media.
  • Waltja offered five units in the Certificate II in Community Services for senior secondary girls at Utopia and Certificate II in Community Services units for Indigenous Youth Workers in the MacDonnell Shire and Central Desert Shire.
  • Waltja’s programs Ngurra Ninti (healthy housing) and Mangarri Palya (healthy food) programs ended in June. Waltja as part of the project produced two resources: Mangarri Palya – Cooking Good Food with recipes from Western desert women, and Ngurra Ninti Healthy Kitchen Book.

2008

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  • A Young Mums project workshop was held at the Alice Springs Desert Park in June, sharing knowledge on traditional practices for new babies between senior women and young women.  Participants talked strongly about the importance of smoking ceremonies, nutrition and health in pregnancy, and the provision of baby bush bags.  Women came from Kintore, Ikuntji, Titjikala, Ltyentye Apurte, Utju, Laramba, Yuelamu, Engawala and Utopia.  The programs had funding from DEWHA’s Indigenous Culture Support Fund.  The baby bush bags were set up by Sarah Holder and Louise Wellington, and included practical baby things and information about services.  Women from Areyonga and Yuendumu helped to develop a resource about traditional ways to introduce a new baby into a family, using paintings and photographs, and this booklet was included in the baby bush bags.
  • Waltja was a finalist in the Reconciliation Australia Indigenous Governance Award.  Irene Nangala, Margaret Orr, Nancy Tilmouth, Isobel Nampitjinpa and Kate Lawrence went to Melbourne for the award presentations.
  • Waltja started a 2-year project training youth workers in remote communities, funded through DEEWR.  The project involved delivering training in Certificate II in Community Services Work (Youth work specialisation).  Wendy Brown was involved in the development of the model.  Kate Lawrence and Liz Archer were key workers in the training resource development and delivery.  The first workshop was held at 7 Mile with learners from Titjikala, Santa Teresa and Yuendumu.
  • In March, a workshop was held on suicide prevention for community members from Santa Teresa, Titjikala and Mt Leibig.
  • Waltja contracted Julie Sheehan to deliver the Money Business program for people on Centrelink in remote communities, starting in Areyonga and Santa Teresa.
  • Louise Wellington from Waltja worked with Kylie Jericho from Amity Community Services to deliver a Gambling and Wise Use of Money’ workshop in Papunya.
  • Minmaku Palyantja Palya: WAVE/Waltja Women Leaders project started.  It was a collaboration with Women in Adult and Vocational Education (WAVE), supporting Aboriginal women’s leadership, produced leadership profiles, posters. Independent Evalulation by Angela Lynch and Joy Taylor.
  • Waltja received funding through the DEEWR Indigenous Small Business Fund to develop a 10 –year Strategic Business Plan: consultants Raelene Boyle and Wendy Bell were contracted.

2007

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  • Waltja’s Young Mums and Bubs Program began, supporting new mums through access to traditional knowledge and support, and providing baby bush bags, which hold the essentials for a new baby.
  • In partnership with Desert Knowledge Cooperative Resource Centre (DKCRC) Waltja participated in a Feral Camel Management Project, to find out what communities wanted to do about the problem of too many camels in the Central desert region.  Irene Nangala took a lead role in this project with other Research Nintirinjaku workers.
  • Waltja was incorporated under the Corporations Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act (CATSI) in 2007 when the Act replaced the legislation that we were previously incorporated under. ORIC (Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations) supports and regulates corporations incorporated under the CATSI Act.
  • Waltja Reconnect team contributed to the National Inquiry into Youth Homelessness.
  • Waltja commenced a 2-year project with the Mental Health Association of Central Australia (MHACA) on suicide prevention.  Isobel Gorey played a lead role in this project.  The project included young men’s program, which represented a shift from women or family based programs a specific male focus. Charlie Hodgkins was the Waltja worker for this program.
  • In partnership with Amity Community Services, Waltja ran a 2-day Gambling and Intervention workshop in March at Ltyentye Apurte (Santa Teresa).  In addition to locals, participants came from Engawala, Titjikala and Areyonga.
  • In September, Waltja participated in the SNAICC National Conference in Adelaide.
  • Waltja was funded through DEET to support Nintirinjaku workers to gain Certificate I and II in Business, to learn skills in office equipment and admin to support their work.

2006

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  • In February, Waltja held a 2-day workshop in Coober Pedy with women from Waltja’s child care communities and communities on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara (AP) Lands, so that people could learn about Waltja’s ways of working around childcare services and to decide if they wanted to work with Waltja in the future. Two more workshops were held with Waltja members and women from the APY Lands – Hamilton Downs in June and Umuwa in August, training about childcare and sharing stories about child rearing and to plan a mobile childcare program for communities in the APY Lands. This was the start of a major childcare project in the AP Lands that has continued till the present (2013).
  • In March, Waltja ran a nutrition workshop at Engawala for women from Engawala, 6 Mile and Willowra.  UNICEF, Telstra Foundation and Rio Tinto supported the workshop.
  • Waltja’s Palya Palyanma Pipirri Wiima Tjutaku Doing Good for Little Kids Childcare resource book 2000-2006 was produced.  Major contributors: Irene Nangala, Ada Dixon, Marilyn Nangala, Wendy Brown, Sharijn King, Teresa Butler-Bowdon, Amanda Nardoo.
  • In March Irene Nangala and Kathryn Priest from FaCSIA went to England to speak about the Waltja/FaCSIA partnership Warrki Jarrinjaku Jintangkamanu Purananjaku Aboriginal Child Rearing Strategy.
  • At the official opening of the Kurdu Kurdu Kurlangu Child Care Centre in Yuendumu, Wendy Brown and Marlette Ross were presented Certificates of Recognition for their commitment to children’s services from Batchelor College.
  • Another youth worker training workshop was held at Hamilton Downs, funded for the fourth year by FaCSIA and coordinated by Waltja.  The focus was workers in Outside School Hours Care and Reconnect Services.
  • Waltja Reconnect team contributed to the Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse in NT Communities.
  • An Aged and Disability Workshop was held in June in conjunction with a Waltja management Committee to review Waltja’s disability brokerage and how to build more partnerships with other services for people with disabilities.
  • The Pipirri Tjuta Palya Kanyila, Tjan Ngurra Palya Kanyintjaku project was completed.  This 12-month kids’ nutrition project took place in Titjikala, Mt Leibig and Nyirppi, with funding from the Telstra Foundation.  Pipirri Wiimaku – for the little kids posters, Pipirri Palya – Kids are good recipes book and Mangarri Palya – nutrition activities for kids were produced as part of the project.
  • Desert Knowledge Cooperative Resource Centre (DKCRC) approached Waltja to develop a Research Nintirinjaku project based on the successful Training Nintirinjaku model developed by Waltja.  Two workshops were held during the year, with participation from Waltja members from Kintore, Mt Leibig, Papunya, Yuelamu, Engawala, Mpwellare and Titjikala who were interested in working with DKCRC on research projects in bush foods, cattle businesses, and feral camels.
  • Waltja Outside Schools Hours Program ran a mobile circus school with Circosis in Imampa, Katukatjara, Ampilatwatja, Papunya and Walungurru.
  • Sharijn King, Marilyn Nangala and Christine Armstrong presented about Waltja’s child rearing project at an Indigenous Research Conference in Cairns.
  • Rob Bowman and Kate Lawrence created a website: Disability Central which provided information about services and support for people with disability in Central Australia and linked disability clients, carers, service providers and training organisations.
  • In June, April Martin and Kate Lawrence presented on working well with Aboriginal People on Their Communities, at the Making a Difference Conference for Direct Support Workers, Personal Assistants and Carers, in Alice Springs.
  • Waltja managed The Wise Use of Money to Keep Families and Communities Strong project, looking at the issues for families associated with problem gambling.  This was funded through the NT Community Benefit Fund.
  • Reconnect worked with Deadly Treadlies to run a bike maintenance program at Mt Leibig.
  • Margaret Orr, Marilyn Nangala and Kate Lawrence delivered a keynote address on Waltja’s work with Security4Women, at the Business and Professional Women’s Conference, Alice Springs.
  • Waltja received some funding through the NT Office of the Chief Minister to support involving young women in Waltja Directors meetings.  This project enabled young women to be mentored by Directors at a Waltja workshop at Hamilton Downs.

2005

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  • In March Marilyn Nangala and Kathryn Priest from FaCS South Australia travelled to England to deliver the keynote address at the International Leadership Symposium. They talked about the strong work Waltja has been doing with the Warrki Jarrinjaku Aboriginal Child Rearing Strategy.
  • In April Waltja held an Aged Care workshop at Hamilton Downs for over 145 of elderly people, disabled people and carers from 18 communities in Central Australia.  The aim was to consult with the participants about how to address issues for the elderly in remote communities, including poverty, poor health and lack of service provision.  The consultation was documented in paintings and in words.  The Mercy Foundation, Frontier Services, Commonwealth Carelink and a number of Alice Springs businesses, supported the workshop.
  • Waltja in partnership with Women in Adult and Vocational Education (WAVE) worked on a Security for Women (S4W) research project into training needs for Aboriginal women and their communities. The project was called Helping people to help themselves: a study of training issues for Aboriginal women and their remote communities.  This included a workshop about remote community training needs at the Alice Springs Desert Park in conjunction with Waltja’s AGM.
  • Over 2005/6 Waltja supported Outside School Hours Care in Ikuntji, Yuendumu, Watiyawanu, Imanpa, Utju, Ampilatwatja, Yuelamu, Walungurru, Titjikala, Mutitjulu, Ltyentye Apurte, Ntaria, Willowra, Mpwelarre, Engawala, Kaltukatjara, Ali Curung and Papunya.  Highlights included an OSHC workshop with Batchelor College, a Red Hot Arts Workshop and Alchemical Artz at Ikuntji.
  • Waltja secured some funding through the Racing, Gaming and Licensing Division of the NT Treasury to hold workshops about gambling and the impact on individuals, families and the community.  In partnership with AMITY, amelioration of gambling funds, the project was called Wise Use of Money
  • Waltja Reconnect team contributed to Senate Inquiry into Petrol Sniffing.
  • The Anangu Uwankare Kulini – Everyone Understanding: 3-year project started in Mt Leibig 2005 and continued in Willowra 2006, and Pmara Jutjunta 2007-8.  The project was funded through Dept for Communications, IT and the Arts (DCITA) and DHCS, to help children with hearing disability to participate in the classroom. The Kulini project created a multimedia training resource for teachers and family to communicate in traditional signing, Auslan, spoken and written community language and English.  Kate Lawrence, Marilyn Nangala and Rob Bowman led the project, with involvement of Auslan interpreter Deanella Mack, filmmaker Chris Tangey, Malcolm Long (Pmara Jutunta), Alison Gilles (Willowra), IT consultant Jane Clark. Resources produced: Kulini (Mt Liebig: animation), Kuklini 2: Rdaka Rdaka (Willowra: film) Kulini 3: Keeping strong and healthy Anmatjere Way Ti Tree/Pmara Jutunta: film).
  • Over 90 people attended a youth worker training workshop at Hamilton Downs, funded for the third year by FaCS and coordinated by Waltja, working with NPY Women’s Council, Gap Youth Service, ASYASS, Tangentyere Council, Congress, FaCS, DHCS, Incite Youth Arts and CAYLUS.
  • Waltja collaborated with Incite Youth Arts to develop the Artastic Bush Program at Mt Leibig to help young people build their confidence as artists.  An exhibition of works created during the project was held in 2006.
  • Sarah Holder, Katie Allen, Dulcie Kelly and Carol Peterson took eight young women from Mt Liebig community to Melbourne as part of Mt Liebig’s Young Women’s Youth Leadership Program.
  • The Warrki Jarrinjaku partnership was written up in “Preparing the ground for partnership: exploring quality assurance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander childcare: a literature review and background paper”, published by FaCS (December).
  • Irene Nangala, Wendy Brown, Marilyn Nangala, Marlette Ross, Kayleen Collins, Christine Armstrong, Natalie Misic, Linda Heranghi, Rene Douglas and Margaret Orr attended the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education (WIPCE) in Hamilton, New Zealand.  Irene Nangala, Wendy Brown and Kathry Priest presented a paper on Warrki Jarrinjaku Aboriginal Child Rearing Strategy

2004

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  • Western Desert Dialysis House opened in September in Alice Springs.  Waltja worked with WDD for a long time, providing auspicing services, and assisted with lobbying and advocating for the service.
  • Wendy Brown and Sharijn King travelled to Canberra to do a presentation for the FaCS Secretary Mark Sullivan and Kathryn Priest from FaCS South Australia. They talked about the strong work Waltja did with the Warrki Jarrinjaku Aboriginal Child Rearing Strategy – bringing together community women and government workers in an innovative children’s services and research project across WA, NT and SA.
  • A Youth worker workshop was held at Wallace Rockhole.
  • Nyirrpi Child Care Centre was opened.  Waltja’s role had been to help with advocacy for the centre, and through a community nutrition program.
  • Wendy Brown, Marlette Ross, Marilyn Nangala, Kayleen Collins, Nancy Tilmouth and Katie Allen attended Growing Up Culture Strong: National Indigenous child rearing and good practice in service delivery workshop, Brisbane, June, run by FaCS.  They all presented the keynote address.
  • Irene Nangala created the logo for the National Indigenous child rearing and good practice in service delivery workshop.
  • Waltja held a Tucker Box Workshop at Tilmouth Well Roadhouse in collaboration with the Centre for Appropriate Technology.  This included training in nutrition, food technology, simple construction and safe operation of hand and power tools.   Each participant made her own Tucker Box.
  • Rosemary Daniels, Petra Turner, Annette Hayes and Kate Lawrence spoke for Waltja at the Making a Difference Conference for Disability Workers in Alice Springs.
  • Waltja started up Training Nintiringjaku, an initiative to generate paid casual work for Aboriginal people who helped to identify training needs for their community, promote training in their communities, and interpreting in meetings with training providers and in training sessions.  DEET, Reframing the Future, Security4Women, CAT and CARHDS provided support for the project.  Margaret Orr, Nancy Tilmouth, Irene and Marilyn Nangala, Kayleen Collins, Rita Napangardi and Carol Petersen completed units in Certificate IV in Training and Assessment with CAT as part of their Nintiringtjaku training.
  • Waltja presented at the Pathways 7 Conference in Alice Springs. Marilyn Nangala, Rosemary Daniels, Annette Hayes, Rob Bowman and Kate Lawrence all spoke about how they work to make a good life for people in remote communities with disabilities.
  • In November Titjikala Child Care Centre opened.  Waltja provided auspicing support.
  • Publications Unit trainee Dwain Westbrook won a $10,000 Training Foundation Award for his work with Waltja.

2003

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  • Waltja’s lease expired on premises in Elder Street. Waltja Directors decided to buy land and set up a purpose built building rather than rent again and risk having to move again when a lease expired.  Initially, Waltja gained a commitment of funding for the new premises from government, and members were involved in contributing to the design of the building.  When the promise of funding was withdrawn, Waltja Directors decided to take out a loan and manage the development of premises at 3 Ghan Rd, Alice Springs themselves, gradually developing the site over the next 10 years, as they could afford it.  Demountables were purchased and refurbished.
  • Warrki Jarinjaku National project commenced – funded by FaCS.  The project had two streams: the Warrki Jarinjaku partnership process of shared responsibility and accountability and traditional Aboriginal child rearing principles and practices.
  • The Federal Minister for Health and Aging, Kevin Andrews, visited Waltja to talk abut the aged care needs for remote communities.
  • In March, Waltja Childcare workers assisted the Yuelamu community to celebrate the opening of their childcare building.
  • Waltja Reconnect team contributed to the Review of the Child Welfare Act.
  • In May, Waltja supported the opening of the Mt Leibig Pipirriku Child Care Centre, nine years after the Mt Leibig community first started lobbying for a centre.
  • Waltja celebrated NAIDOC with cultural activities in Todd Mall with elders from Walungurru, Yuelamu and Laramba.
  • Chairperson, Margaret Orr, and Candice Milera participated in a national training course on Governance in Indigenous Organisations.
  • The WA Stronger Families project was extended so that stories on men’s role in growing up children could be focussed on.  Sharijn King worked with men in Mulan and Halls Creek to gather stories.
  • In August, Margaret Orr and Christine Armstrong met with Mutitjulu Council to talk about how Waltja could support childcare in the community.
  • Marilyn Nangala, Rosemary Daniels and Kate Lawrence presented about partnerships with Aboriginal Communities at a disability conference in Alice Springs
  • UNICEF supported a nutrition project in Bonya and Willowra.
  • Margaret Orr and Irene Nangala helped staff the Commonwealth Carelink stand at Alice Springs Show, to promote Waltja and its Carelink program.
  • Sharijn King, Wendy Brown, Irene Nangala and Kathy Priest gave a keynote address to the Our Children our Future Conference in Adelaide, in May.
  • Mt Allan Child Care Centre officially opened.  Waltja’s role had included: advocacy on behalf of Ikuntji community for a building; planning, training and support for the child care staff and committee; and support for Batchelor College in the delivery of training on site.
  • Waltja ran an Aged and Disability Workshop at Yuelamu.
  • Waltja AGM was held at the Araluen Cultural Precinct in Alice Springs.
  • Waltja held a training workshop for the Steering Committees for Waltja’s major projects over 2 days at the Telegraph Station.
  • Waltja joined Secretariat for National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care (SNAICC).
  • Mt Leibig’s purpose built Child Care Centre was opened and Waltja’s nutrition workers planted fruit trees and shade trees around the centre.
  • Waltja held a big RAAASS (Remote Area Aboriginal Alcohol and Other Substance Strategy) funded workshop for youth workers at Hamilton Downs. Waltja looked at plans and strategies to help young people, families and communities to address petrol sniffing and other substance misuse issues.
  • Waltja ran a Childcare Careers Workshop in Alice Springs with Childcare workers from Kintore, Ikuntji, Nyirrpi, Yuelamu, Areyonga, Papunya, Mt Leibig and Laramba.  The workers visited local childcare centres to share ideas about programming, menu planning, age appropriate activities and the administration and management of centres.

2002

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  • Waltja organised the Culture and Careers Workshop for young women aged 15-18 at Ross River Resort. 69 people attended over the 5 days.  Irene Nangala played a lead role in this event.
  • Waltja childcare workers started working with Mt Leibig childcare workers to move to a new purpose build centre.  Waltja helped set up the new centre, establish routines, keep records and plan menus and activities.  The building was completed in late 2002.
  • Waltja received funding through the National Child Nutrition Strategy and UNICEF Australia  for a 3-year program to support the establishment and sustainability of community nutrition for 0-5 year olds.  The original 3 communities were Mt Leibig, Titjikala and Nyirrpi.  Katie Allen and Mary Jane Herron were fieldworkers for the program.
  • Warrki Jarrinjaku Jintangkamanu Purananjaku “Working together everyone and listening” Aboriginal Child Rearing and Associated Research: a review of the literature was published by FaCS.  Research compiled by Teresa Butler-Bowdon.  Contributing editors were Wendy Nungarrayi Brown, Sharijn King and Kathryn Priest.
  • Ikuntji Child Care Centre was officially opened.  Waltja’s role had included: advocacy on behalf of Ikuntji community for a building; planning, training and support for the child care staff and committee; support for Batchelor College in the delivery of Certificate II in Community Services (community work).
  • In May, Waltja published Pipirri Palya – Kids Are Good, a resource for parents and for everybody who helps to grow up babies and little kids.  The project was supported through the Child Abuse preventions and Parenting Support program of FaCS.
  • Waltja’s nutrition program began in six communities, with the aim of helping to improve the nutrition and health of children up to 5 years old.
  • Laundry Book Looking after the Laundry and Washing Machines was published. The main worker on this project was Jenny Teo.
  • In August, a Waltja facilitated a workshop with women from Blackstone, Mulan and Balgo, who met with Waltja members from Mt Leibig and Kintore.  The focus was on keeping kids happy, healthy and strong.
  • With support from DoHA, Waltja started a 2-year program with several communities on suicide prevention.  This was the start of Waltja’s work specifically in this area,  working with the Life Promotion Program (LPP).  Workers involved in this program were Katie Allen, Liz Archer and Sarah Holder.
  • As Waltja’s representative, Sharijn King joined the steering committee for the Strengthening Families in the Ngaanyatjarra Lands Project, managed by Ngaanyatjarra Health.
  • Flexible Learning Framework Learnscope projects: Waltja staff received professional development in multimedia, website development, learning resources development for Waltja staff. Kate Lawrence was projects leader, Dwain Westbrook and Viv Pettit developed website and MARVIN resources.

 2001

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  • Walta’s AGM was held at Hamilton Downs.  Every community in the central desert region was faxed with invitations to the AGM.  People from SA (APY Lands) also attended.  This was the first formal Waltja event where women from the Central Desert sat down with women from the APY Lands.
  • Waltja held the Palya Palyanma Pipirri Wiima Tjutaku – Doing Good for Little Kids Indigenous Early Childhood Conference from 2-6 April at the Red Centre Resort in Alice Springs.  Waltja organised for 300 women from NT, SA and WA remote communities to meet in Alice Springs to focus on childcare and children’s service needs for remote communities.  Conference organisers included Irene Nangala, Wendy Nungarrayi Brown, Marilyn Nangala and Sharijn King.
  • Pipirri Wiimaku (for the little kids) Innovative Child Care Report 2000-2001was published by Waltja, in conjunction with the Indigenous Early Childhood Conference.  This report included Pipirri Kanyilpayi caring for children child rearing practices report 2000-2001.  Contributors to the project were all the members of the Waltja Childcare Steering Committee.
  • In conjunction with Walungurru Community Council, Waltja managed a community mural project, with funding from FaCS, working with Walungurru youth to produce a number of freestanding murals, which were placed around the community.  Before installation the murals were exhibited at Araluen Gallery in May-July.  The exhibition was titled Kanya Kulintjaku – Hang on and listen.
  • Bronwyn Bishop, then Federal Minister for Health and Aged Care, visited Waltja to officially launch the Commonwealth Carelink program.
  • Waltja was contracted to deliver the Minimum Data Set training and support to all Home and Community Care (HACC) Services in Central Australia.
  • Mt Liebig Community members and Waltja worked together on a program to reduce Petrol Sniffing, particularly to help the young men in the community.  Marilyn Nangala was a leader in this project.
  • Waltja ran a training program on safe food handling for the Mt Leibig Aged Care Service.
  • Waltja received funding from the WA Department of Health and Aging for a 2-year project to produce a resource book for the Wirrimanu community on child rearing practices.  Sharijn King took a lead role in the project and ran story-gathering workshops at Yulara and Mulan with Wendy Brown.
  • Waltja Staff Procedures Manual was updated.  Sharijn King wrote the first manual.
  • Reconnect Services for young people (12-18) at risk began in Papunya, Mt Leibig, Titjikala and Santa Teresa.  Reconnect supports young people with education, training and employment, and with cultural, arts, and sport and recreation activities.  Waltja has succeeded in retaining the program with funding from FaCS/FaCSIA for 12 years to date (2013). Stewart Blyth was the worker who established Reconnect.  Other long-term workers were Katie Allan, Liz Archer, Sarah Holder, Lena Campbell, Sammy Butcher and Robbie Kopp.
  • In September Waltja participated in a workshop for the committee members of the Aboriginal Student Support and Parental Awareness program (ASSPA).
  • In November, the Western Dialysis Appeal Committee held its first meeting.  Irene Nangala participated.
  • In October, Waltja supported women from Titjikala, Mt Leibig and Yuendumu to participate in the Reclaim the Night March in Alice Springs.

 2000

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  • Waltja’s AGM was held in March at Telegraph Station, Alice Springs.
  • In July, with only two weeks organising time, Sharijn King brought together a steering committee including Executive members, to organise the NAIDOC Week events in Alice Springs, including organising the NAIDOC March, Sports Day, Battle of the Bands, and Baby Competition.  Over 4000 people participated in events over the week.
  • Waltja held Where are Our Kids Going? – a workshop about parenting which brought people from across the central desert communities together at Ross River to learn about schooling, training and careers available to their young men and women.
  • Waltja held the Kungka Ninti Girls are Clever youth careers workshop at Hamilton Downs.
  • Wendy Nungarrayi Brown attended the World Forum on Early Care and Education held in Singapore – she was the only Aboriginal person there out of 400 participants.
  • Waltja successfully tendered for the national Commonwealth Carelink program, which aimed to improve services to older Australians and young people with disabilities. Waltja has continued to be funded for this service directly until 20.., and then in partnership with Frontier Services (as at 2013).
  • Waltja Child Care Steering Committee was formed, including: Magda Kingsley, Sharon Wagajera, Janet Kalion, Marilyn Nangala, Kayleen Collins, Sylvanna Mark, Irene Nangala, Eileen Napaltjarra, Alison Multa, Kathleen Nungarrayi, Wendy Nungarrayi, Marlette Ross, Ada Dixon, Nancy Tilmouth, Raelene Weir, Margaret Orr, Narabri Nakamurra, Amy Wakura, Jozan Collins, Candice Millera and Sharijn King.
  • Waltja Child Care Steering Committee held workshops at Yuendumu, Ross River, Adelaide and Alice Springs to discuss the need for early childhood services in remote communities, to collect case stories about community childcare, record information about child rearing practices, to plan an Early Childhood Conference for 2001 and who should attend (this is documented in Pipirri Wiimaku “For the little kids” Innovative Child Care Report 2000-1).
  • Waltja field worker Katie Allen recorded stories and visual information about childrearing from men and women in Walungurru, which was the start of the use of symbol maps in recording child rearing practices.
  • Fifteen Waltja members (including members of the Waltja Child Care Steering Committee) from the Centre and WA travelled by bus to Adelaide to talk strongly for the provision of childcare services in remote communities.
  • Waltja’s then Vice-Chairperson Irene Nangala, and Executive member Marilyn Nangala were elected to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC).
  • The Toilet Book was published with financial support from ATSIC and Territory Health Services, guided by a Steering Committee from representatives from Central Australian Aboriginal organisations, NGOs and Commonwealth and Territory Government Departments.  This was early example of Waltja’s focus on working collaboratively to share expertise and resources to gain good outcomes for people in remote communities.  3000 copies of the book were produced, and distributed widely.  The book was also used as an educational tool for East Timor refugees using flush toilets for the first time.

1999

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  • Waltja’s management committee and staff sat down with Elders from the Western desert near Mt Leibig to discuss how elderly people wanted to be cared for.  People wanted to stay on country and have culturally appropriate services that reflect the best of the old ways and new ways.  A series of paintings were produced by elders from different communities about the old ways of caring for the elderly, and about first contact with Whitefellas.
  • Irene Nangala and Sharijn King made a keynote presentation to a conference in Cairns on the importance of providing services for families on country.
  • Waltja gathered information on the types of programs and activities provided by women’s centres in remote communities.  Waltja worked with The Women’s Shelter on this project.  A report was prepared which was used by Waltja and other organisations to lobby for funding for these multi-purpose centres.
  • Waltja Executive and Manager participated in Ministerial forums on Family Violence, providing input into government planning and responses to family violence.
  • Waltja developed a childcare resource book.
  • At meetings to develop Waltja’s Strategic Plan 1999-2001, Waltja executive members taught communications, painting, bead making and dancing as part of the process of sharing culture and building a plan.

1998

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  • The first Aged and Disability Festival was organised by Waltja, and held at Town Bore.  Participants came from Ikuntji, Haasts Bluff, Papunya, Kintore and Mount Leibig.
  • Waltja was funded by OATSIHS and DASA to broker Petrol Sniffing programs in remote communities in Central Australia, producing resources and advocating community driven programs and training to address substance misuse.
  • Waltja auspiced the Remote Area Disability Brokerage, enabling Aboriginal people with a disability to live in their community with their families, with access to appropriate Service.  Key people involved in this program in communities were Arthur Wilson, Emily Cox, April Martin, Brian McDonald, Punata Stockman and Raymond Webb.  This program has continued to be funded through till current time (2013)
  • Waltja developed and ran the Workers Book Project to support community councils on five remote communities, to manage planning, recruitment, induction, probation, resignation and termination, using the Workers Book as a resource.  DEETYA and the Aboriginal Development Unit funded the program.
  • Waltja worked with communities to identify service needs to prevent youth homelessness and suicides.  An Indigenous Youth Day was organised, with over 300 young people attending.
  • Waltja trainee, Donna Lemon was NT Trainee of the Year.
  • A Waltja staff member represented Central Australia at the first International Conference on young people and drugs.
  • Waltja worked with Yuendumu Child Care Centre to develop an operational handbook.  The Centre was the first licenced childcare centre in remote Central Australia.  Wendy Brown was involved in this project, as an employee at the Centre.
  • Pipirri Palya Kids Are Good program started, with support from FaCS – the aim of which was to increase parents’ self esteem and lower rates of depression by recognising and acknowledging the importance of traditional parenting practices and combining this with modern non-Aboriginal methods of giving children the best possible start in life.

1997

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  • CAFRC members decided that the services provided by CAFRC were important and the organisation should continue in a different form.
  • Waltja Tjutangku Palyapayi Association was registered, incorporated in October and a new constitution adopted, specifying that only women living in remote communities could stand for election to the management committee and Executive.
  • The disability brokerage service continued through the new organisation.
  • Waltja’s logo was designed by Punata Stockman from Mt Leibig community.
  • Waltja’s first AGM was held at the Old Telegraph Station, Alice Springs.  The first Executive Committee comprised: Margaret Orr (Chairperson), Marilyn Nangala (Vice Chairperson), Margaret Campbell (Public Officer), Irene Nangala (Treasurer) and Ada Nangala Dixon (Vice Treasurer).
  • Sharijn King was employed as Waltja Manager.  Other workers were Lesley King, Rachel Abbott, Catherine Coulthard, Jack Parkinson, Travis McClean, Michelle Lord, Donna Lemon, Candice Milera and Valerie Mille
  • Waltja developed a set of operating principles focussing on governance, service provision and training and skill development.
  • Waltja established a publications unit to provide culturally appropriate resources, including the magazine Family News.
  • Waltja received funding from DEETYA to develop an employment and training strategy.
  • Waltja became a registered training organisation (RTO) and retained that registration meeting all the quality requirements and national standards, until May 2012 when the Executive decided it was too costly for a small organisation.  Waltja’s scope covered a number of Certificates in Community Services and in Business.

1996

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  • Women’s Centre Workers Management Training held at Hamilton Downs in October – a collaboration between the Centre for Appropriate Technology and CAFRC.  Trainers included Margaret Orr (who would become the first Chairperson of Waltja), Coordination and Report prepared by Sharijn King.  Many of the participants became involved in Waltja.
  • Commonwealth funding through ATSIC for Family Resource Centres and many similar organisations across Australia was withdrawn and re-allocated to youth service organisations.

1995

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  • CAFRC published the Workers Book: Finding and Keeping the Right Worker.  The book produced by Ann Mosey with CAFRC workers, Kathrina O’Bryen, Claudia Manu Preston and Ruth Clarke with CAFRC Manager Sharijn King.
  • The Disability Brokerage was first established with funding from Department of Health and Community Services.  An Aged and Disability Brokerage Committee was set up of seven senior Aboriginal women from remote communities to make decisions about assistance for individuals and families.

1993

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  • Waltja’s precursor, the Central Australian Resource Centre (CAFRC) commenced operations, with Commonwealth government funding. Sharijn King was employed as the manager of the CAFRC.
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